Plastic Surgeons Get Tips on Managing Opioid Addiction Risk

Also receive data on warnings on anesthesia before age 3

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| Source: American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Arlington Heights, Oct. 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The American Society of Plastic Surgeons has two articles that will be published in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), that may be of interest to the general public.

Article 1: Plastic Surgeons Get Tips on Managing Opioid Addiction Risk

September 28, 2017 – Opioid medications prescribed for pain management after plastic surgery may contribute to the ongoing opioid epidemic, according to a special topic paper in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Plastic surgeons must recognize their patients' risk of developing opioid use disorders and that the opioids they prescribe may be diverted to non-medical use, according to the article by Daniel Demsey, MD, of University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and colleagues.

"Surgeon opioid prescribing practices contribute to the opioid addiction crisis," Dr. Demsey said. "Improvements in prescribing practices can improve patient safety."

Article 2: Warnings on Anesthesia Before Age 3 – Plastic Surgeons Get Update on Evidence

September 28, 2017 – The evidence behind the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recent drug safety warning regarding prolonged anesthesia in infants and young children is discussed in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Pending further research on the possible hazards of anesthesia, elective plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures lasting more than three hours can be delayed until after age 3 if possible, according to the special topic paper by Dr. Christopher Armen Derderian of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, and colleagues. If surgery can't be delayed, strategies to reduce the child's anesthesia exposure are recommended.

If you'd like to speak with Dr. Demsey or Dr. Derderian about the findings and what they suggest, please contact me at kkubiak@plasticsurgery.org or 847-981-5406.Thanks for your time and consideration.

Kim Kubiak

Senior Communications Associate

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

444 East Algonquin Road | Arlington Heights, IL 60005

P: 847-981-5406 | F: 847-981-5474    

E: kkubiak@plasticsurgery.org

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A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/251557da-f752-47eb-9331-345600ce74ee

Kim Kubiak
American Society of Plastic Surgeons
847-981-5406
kkubiak@plasticsurgery.org